Wednesday, September 11, 2019

Sermon Text: 1 Timothy 1:12-17, September 11, 2019

Grace to you and peace from God our Father and from our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.  Amen.

The text this morning is from Paul’s first letter to Timothy, the first chapter:
I thank him who has given me strength, Christ Jesus our Lord, because he judged me faithful, appointing me to his service, though formerly I was a blasphemer, persecutor, and insolent opponent. But I received mercy because I had acted ignorantly in unbelief, and the grace of our Lord overflowed for me with the faith and love that are in Christ Jesus. The saying is trustworthy and deserving of full acceptance, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am the foremost. But I received mercy for this reason, that in me, as the foremost, Jesus Christ might display his perfect patience as an example to those who were to believe in him for eternal life. To the King of the ages, immortal, invisible, the only God, be honor and glory forever and ever. Amen. 
Thus far the text.

My dear friends in Christ,
     Chief of sinners though I be, Jesus shed His blood for me.  That’s the whole message of today’s text.  Paul sets up an interesting argument in today’s text, that, in ignorance, he acted evilly, yet it was through that ignorance that he received mercy.  Now, that shouldn’t set up for us an idea that everyone who is ignorant of the Lordship of Jesus Christ will receive that same mercy and will be brought to salvation, but that ignorance can be turned to the merciful heart of the Lord.

     Jesus Christ came into the world to save sinners.  That is His mission, and I say is, because it still is His mission, that, though He lived and died 2000 years ago, today He lives again to bring the mercy and grace won on the cross to those who have otherwise turned away from Him.  He is the same yesterday, today, and forever.  His desire to save sinners has never changed.  And if He can save one like Paul, if He can save one like me, then I know that there is no one He can’t save.

Sermon Audio: 1 Timothy 1:12-17, September 11, 2019

A sermon preached by Pastor Lewis Polzin on September 11, 2019 at St. Peter–Immanuel Lutheran Church in Milwaukee, WI, on 1 Timothy 1:12-17. The text of this sermon may be found by clicking this link and you may play the audio of the sermon here.

Sunday, September 8, 2019

Sermon Audio: Luke 14:25-35, September 8, 2019

A sermon preached by Pastor Lewis Polzin on September 8, 2019 at St. Peter–Immanuel Lutheran Church in Milwaukee, WI, on Luke 14:25-35. The text of this sermon may be found by clicking this link and you may play the audio of the sermon here.

Sermon Text: Luke 14:25-35, September 8, 2019

Grace to you and peace from God our Father and from our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.  Amen.

The text this morning is from the Gospel according to Luke, the 14th chapter:
Now great crowds accompanied him, and he turned and said to them, “If anyone comes to me and does not hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, yes, and even his own life, he cannot be my disciple. Whoever does not bear his own cross and come after me cannot be my disciple. For which of you, desiring to build a tower, does not first sit down and count the cost, whether he has enough to complete it? Otherwise, when he has laid a foundation and is not able to finish, all who see it begin to mock him, saying, ‘This man began to build and was not able to finish.’ Or what king, going out to encounter another king in war, will not sit down first and deliberate whether he is able with ten thousand to meet him who comes against him with twenty thousand? And if not, while the other is yet a great way off, he sends a delegation and asks for terms of peace. So therefore, any one of you who does not renounce all that he has cannot be my disciple. “Salt is good, but if salt has lost its taste, how shall its saltiness be restored? It is of no use either for the soil or for the manure pile. It is thrown away. He who has ears to hear, let him hear.” 
Thus far the text.

My dear friends in Christ,
     Jesus is calling you to die today.  The truth is that Christians are being persecuted more now, today, than at any other point in history.  Some say 10,000 Christians, some say 100,000 Christians are killed every year under persecution.  Just look at the Church in China.  The State is coming in and demanding that they rip down all their symbols, that they register each congregation member, that they submit all their sermons and teachings for prior approval.  Any way you cut it, the story isn’t good for Christians today, and it never has been.  Christians are persecuted because they are disciples of Christ not because their unfriendly or unwelcoming, and being a disciple of Christ is a dangerous thing.

     Jesus has never lied about that.  Multiple times throughout the Scriptures, He warns us that we are going to be called to lay down our lives.  He tells us that if we love our father or mother or wife or children or brothers or sisters or even our own lives more than Him, we cannot be His disciples.  If we are unwilling to sacrifice all that we have been given for the sake of Christ, then we aren’t His disciples.  If we are unwilling to go against our family for His sake, then we aren’t His disciples.  If we are unwilling to stand against those whom we love to show them who Jesus is, What He’s done, what He’s called us to do, then we aren’t His disciples.

Sunday, September 1, 2019

Sermon Text: Luke 14:1-14, September 1, 2019

Grace to you and peace from God our Father and from our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.  Amen.

The text this morning is from is from the Gospel according to Luke, the 14th chapter:
One Sabbath, when he went to dine at the house of a ruler of the Pharisees, they were watching him carefully. And behold, there was a man before him who had dropsy. And Jesus responded to the lawyers and Pharisees, saying, “Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath, or not?” But they remained silent. Then he took him and healed him and sent him away. And he said to them, “Which of you, having a son or an ox that has fallen into a well on a Sabbath day, will not immediately pull him out?” And they could not reply to these things. Now he told a parable to those who were invited, when he noticed how they chose the places of honor, saying to them, “When you are invited by someone to a wedding feast, do not sit down in a place of honor, lest someone more distinguished than you be invited by him, and he who invited you both will come and say to you, ‘Give your place to this person,’ and then you will begin with shame to take the lowest place. But when you are invited, go and sit in the lowest place, so that when your host comes he may say to you, ‘Friend, move up higher.’ Then you will be honored in the presence of all who sit at table with you. For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted.” He said also to the man who had invited him, “When you give a dinner or a banquet, do not invite your friends or your brothers or your relatives or rich neighbors, lest they also invite you in return and you be repaid. But when you give a feast, invite the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind, and you will be blessed, because they cannot repay you. For you will be repaid at the resurrection of the just.” 
Thus far the text.

My dear friends in Christ,
     Jesus sure seems to be a fan of Proverbs in the text today.  And by that, I mean, it’s almost like He’s making up new proverbs, which, of course, He can, because He’s God.  I mean, there are so many quotable things in the text.  But, to just rip these out of context misses the fact that all of this is tied together very well.  Let’s start at the beginning.

Sermon Audio: Luke 14:1-14, September 1, 2019

A sermon preached by Pastor Lewis Polzin on September 1, 2019 at St. Peter–Immanuel Lutheran Church in Milwaukee, WI, on Luke 14:1-14. The text of this sermon may be found by clicking this link and you may play the audio of the sermon here.

Sunday, August 25, 2019

Sermon Audio: Luke 13:22-30, August 25, 2019

A sermon preached by Pastor Lewis Polzin on August 25, 2019 at St. Peter–Immanuel Lutheran Church in Milwaukee, WI, on Luke 13:22-30. The text of this sermon may be found by clicking this link and you may play the audio of the sermon here.